Pegboard art wall

CLOSE UP DETAIL OF PEGBOARD HOOK AND CLIP

“Muuuuuuuummmm!….we were playing Pegasus’s and I crashed into the mountain (wall) and some of the pictures came down”. Kid’s rooms and glass-framed art don’t really mix well if you have rowdy ones like mine. It’s basically an open invitation to unnecessary A&E visits. I love art. I grew up surrounded by it because I have an arty family. Dad’s pre-retirement career was as a professional photographer, one sister is an artist and I have a whole bunch of really talented cousins. Insert talented sister/cousin brag – so in awe of this bunch!

So…while I want my kids to grow up surround by art, I’m not keen injuries requiring A&E. I needed a way to display all the kids favourite arty bits and bobs safely. I wanted it to be functional but great to look at too. you can’t go past the good old fashioned pegboard for display walls. There’s just something about all those tiny uniform holes and the background texture it provides. It just works so well, especially in a kids room.  Here is some of my inspiration:

INSPIRATION SOURCED FROM PINTEREST.

SOURCED FROM HOME DESIGN BOARD

And here’s the BEFORE shot: skinny little wall between the entry to the wall and the entry to the walk-through robe and the ensuite (Yes, we are the nutters that once upon a time gave the kids our master suite, don’t worry – we realised our cray cray and took it back again, so the ‘after’ shot will be a bit confusing, our cherubs didn’t suddenly develop a taste for sentimental wedding art).

WALL BEFORE THE PEGBOARD WENT UP. BACK WHEN WE GAVE THE MASTER SUITE TO THE KIDS.

How to install a pegboard on a frame: depth is king.

For a pegboard to actually work properly (not just be pretty to look at), you need depth between the surface of the pegboard and the wall. That’s how pegboards work by the way (in case you were wondering. Like I was). Because so many articles and Pinterest links fail to mention that aspect. Kind of important. Close up detail of kids art hanging safely without glass:

CLOSE UP DETAIL OF PEGBOARD HOOK AND CLIP

The wall space I was using had depth, just enough really.  There are loads of tutes on how to install a pegboard on a proper frame. This video I found really helpful. Here’s how I did mine:

  1. Work out the depth of the wall so that the pegboard (when fixed to the frame) will sit flush with where you want it to. For me, I wanted it to sit just beneath the levels of the door frames so that the edges would be protected. Take into account the depth of the actual pegboard when working out the depth that you’ll have.
  2. Draw up the measurements of the wood you need to make the frame. Hot tip – remember that you don’t want the wood to cover up too many of the pegboard holes. You don’t want your lovely ‘holey pattern’ being ruined.
  3. Go to your hardware store and choose both the timber for the frame and the pegboard. I like the  look of the brown pegboard, but if you’re looking to paint it – a word of warning: it’s quite absorbant so you’ll need a few coats. You can get white pegboard too. the pegboard can warp easily and it’s not a highly used product so it might be up the top of the stackers. Just ask if you can’t see it.

SOURCING THE PEGBOARD AT THE HARDWARE STORE

4. Speak very nicely to the lovely people in the timber section, show them your drawing and get them to cut the bits of frame up for you and also trim your pegboard to size. They might if they’re not busy and in a good mood and it will save you loads of time. Hot tip. As they are cutting the frame, write on them with a pencil (LH , Middle, RH etc) so you can easily put the puzzle together. You won’t see it, it’s behind the pegboard. If they’re busy or not obliging, cut the timber to size at home.

5. Nail or screw the frame to the wall. This is creating the depth so you can actually use the pegboard accessories.

FRAME SCREWED TO THE WALL

6. If you have any light switches/plugs, you’ll need to cut around them. Measure a template using the edge of the board as your benchmark. We also used spare pegboard to pack the plugs out so that they were flush with the surface of the pegboards. Care required, and best to use an electrician if not confident with this. We had 3 plugs to sort. Not going to lie…super, super fun times.

PACKING OUT THE PLUGS SO LEVEL WITH THE SURFACE OF THE PEGBOARD.

7. Nail the pegboard to the frame and paint the nailheads the colour of your pegboard if fussy like me.

8. Now for the fun bit. Pegboards are so awesome for displays because there are so many options. Shelves, baskets, plain hooks. Check out this awesome NZ Supplier. That’s why pegboards are such a great storage option, idea for a study to really maximise your working area.

Here’s what it looked like when it was still the kids room….

KIDS PEGBOARD ART WALL

And here’s what it looks like now that the master suite belongs to us again:

PEGBOARD AFTER

And if you happen to want gold pegboard hooks and bulldog clips, just spray them.

You May Also Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>